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Radha & Krishna

2010-05-03

Radha & Krishna

February is the month of LOVE; and, as such, my muses seem to be working overtime! =) I've put together several articles that I will share throughout the month of February. LOVE has become my favorite thing to talk about and there are so many varying degrees of it, that it continues to fascinate, inspire and enlighten me.

This first post is about Radha and Krishna. Reading about them really moved me and I thought I would share their story here. Keep in mind that Krishna is the Supreme Personality of Godhead. Without knowing that, a person cannot acquire the proper understanding on these lilas or
past-times, which are eternal and really meant as a metaphor for a
human's love for Divinity and God's love for us. To me, it signifies something of a Divine mystical union, and Radha and Krishna fit the definition of Twin Souls ~ and we can relate to it in human terms in regard to the many obstacles we face before we finally get it right. =)

radhamohan.jpg

Hinduism is renowned for its devotion to love. After all, the religion gave us the Kama Sutra. =) Classical legends are both sensual and passionate, much like India's Bollywood films. (if you have ever seen the dances, they are both incredibly synchronized and moving) Probably the best-known love story is that of Radha and Krishna, often referred to as the eternal or Divine couple.

The relationship of Radha and Krishna is the embodiment of love, passion and devotion.


Radha's passion for Krishna symbolizes the soul's intense longing and willingness for the ultimate unification with God. Shri Krishna is the soul of Radha and Radha is definitely the soul of Shri Krishna.
She
is the undivided form of Shri Krishna. She will remain a mystery
unless one can know her inexpressible divine elements. She
is worshipper as well as his deity to be worshipped. She being
a
beloved of Shri Krishna is known as "Radhika".


Krishna is considered the pinnacle of male beauty. The luster of his bluish-black skin; his lotus-like eyes; and his long, luxurious, black locks come together to create an irresistible god.

The word Radha means the greatest worshiper of Krishna. No other gopi in Vrindavana has such a significant name as Sri Radha. Of course, all the Braja gopis love and give
pleasure to Krishna. However, compared to Radhika's ocean of
love for Krishna, the other gopis are merely pools, ponds and
rivers. As the ocean is the original source of all the water
found in lakes and rivers, similarly the love found in the gopis,
and in all the other devotees has its origin in Sri Radha alone.
Since Radha's love is the greatest, she gives the greatest pleasure
to Krishna. 'Krishna enchants the whole world, but Srimati
Radhika enchants even Him. Therefore, Radha is the Supreme Goddess.
'
In Vrindavana, people are accustomed to chant Radha's name more
than Krishna's name.

Radha was the most beautiful of the gopis (cow girls) who herded the cows that belonged to the family that raised Krishna. The two were childhood playmates and, in many regards, soul mates. As Radha was already married when she met Krishna, whose destiny was that of a god, they could not be husband and wife. Yet their devotion to one another was so fierce, it became transcendental. In fact, their bond was so compelling that they are thought of as one.

Radha's love for Krishna is all consuming and compels her to ignore her family honor and disregard her
husband. Radha serves as a symbol for all of the Gopi girls'
love for Krishna. Their relationship develops on Krishna's captivating
charm and aura of passion as Radha falls into a state of desire
for this God. Radha is the soul; Krishna is the God. Krishna
is the shaktiman - possessor of energy - and Radha is His shakti
- energy. She is the female counterpart of the Godhead. She is
the personification of the highest love of God, and by her mercy
the soul is connected with the service and love of Krishna.

The relationship between Radha and Krishna is the example of the highest and purest love, an indissoluble
union of the highest intermingling and completion; it is also
a love expressed through music. Music underlines the illicit
relationship; this love shadowed by secrecy, adultery and scorn,
finds its outlet in Krishna's charming and passionate musical
talents.

Radha is married or involved with someone else, and still cannot resist Krishna's musical call. In being with Him she risks social censure, alienation and humiliation. Riddled with shame and inappropriateness, this is hardly a relationship that purportedly embodies the highest union of pure love. Music
becomes the voice of their illicit love which is too passionate,
and secretive. Krishna is the cosmic musician who woos the gopi's
(cowherd girls) with his tunes. Krishna's flute sounds so powerful
that they embodied the energy of the cosmos. His beauty, charm
and musical skill impassioned women everywhere; at the sound of
his flute playing, the gopis "jump up in the middle of putting
on makeup, abandon their families while eating a meal, leave
food to burn on the stove, and run out of their homes to be with
Krishna". In the embrace of Krishna, the gopis, maddened
with desire, found refuge; in their love dalliance with him who
was the master in all the sixty-four arts of love, the gopis
felt a thrill indescribable; and in making love with him in that
climactic moment of release, in that one binding moment, they
felt that joy and fulfillment which could not but be an aspect
of the Divine.


Through their experience, thus, the erotic the carnal and the profane became but an aspect of the sublime, the spiritual and the divine. This cumulative myth sustained one basic point: for women, Krishna was a personal god, always accessible and unfailingly responsive. He was a god specially
made for women. In the popular psyche, Krishna and Radha became
the universal symbol for the lover and the beloved. Krishna was
the ideal hero, and Radha the ideal heroine.


Krishna led a very pampered and amorous life in the Gokul, alongside thousands of gopikas, the cow herdresses who were all enthralled at His beauty and were thrilled whenever
He played the flute. There are numerous playful instances of
Krishna, playing mischief with the gopikas including breaking
their butter pots.


Krishna represents the private life of the Absolute. His relationship with Radha, His Divine consort, actually constitutes the private life of Krishna. In this relationship, Love reigns supreme as Krishna surrenders to Radha. Krishna is lovestruck while Radha has taken over control. He has surrendered
to the Power of Love. Very few people really understand this
relationship and the message it contains. The supreme object
of devotion, Krishna, worships the highest devotion, Radha. The
zenith of Radha and Krishna's love affair is the Raas-Leela,
the circular dance of love. (The Spiral Dance) The Raas-Leela points to the highest
potential of the soul. It is within this context of the circular
dance that the highest is couched in apparent selfishness.


Radha Krishna is the original principle of loving relationships. The sex principle exists in the Absolute in its pure form without any inebriety or impurity, because Krishna is in fact Radha. In other words, the Lord is one, but for His pleasure and enjoyment, He expands himself to
enjoy loving relationships. The original expansion is Radha.
Together, Radha and Krishna enjoy eternal pastimes of transcendental
love.


Real love exists between Radha and Krishna. Real love is transcendental and spiritual. We have to become attracted to spiritual love and give up false love and beauty, which are only skin-deep. There is nothing beautiful underneath the skin. Krishna (or Christ) consciousness means to be serious and determined
to transcend the material attraction between man and woman in
order to become attracted to the lotus feet of Radha and Krishna. Srila
Prabhupada
said, "The sum and substance of material
life is attraction for woman. And the sum and substance of spiritual
life is attraction for Radha-Krishna
".


Theirs was a love hidden from society, given Radha's status of a married woman. They had their moments of love, passion and anger - just like any two lovers in love and yet their love could not stand the test of duty that Krishna had to face. He had to leave Vrindavan, and Radha, to ensure that the ideals of truth and justice were established but in
the process had to let down the ideal of personal love. He became a
king, defeated innumerable enemies and even married a number of times.
And yet it is said Radha kept waiting for him to come back to her. Her
love for Krishna is considered so divine and so pure that Radha herself
obtained the status of a deity, with her name being inseparably linked
to that of Krishna. Most of Krishna's images are considered complete
when Radha stands by his side.


 

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happy janmastmi

(ajay radha rajput mathura, 2012-08-09 12:43)

Hmare brij mathura m kanha g ka janmutsaw bdi dhoo dham se manaya jata h""mere kanha g plz meri pukar prathna sun ko koi aisa chmtkar kr do jisse m bhout bda dhanwan bn jao or radha k parent man jaye or mere b plz kanha g,tmhare hi budhu hm dono ajayradha jai shri krishna janmdin ki hardik subhkamnaye hum dono ki trph se radhajay,jai shri krishna

happy janmastmi

(ajay radha rajput mathura, 2012-08-09 12:34)

Hmare brij mathura m kanha g ka janmutsaw bdi dhoo dham se manaya jata h jisme hm sbi unka janm ho jane k bad prasad se apna brat todte h jai shri krishna

Lovely Lord

(Shyam Krishna Shrestha, 2011-06-23 17:47)

Missing ownself

 

 

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